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Barbara Lynn Barbara Lynn

Barbara Lynn was well ahead of her time in being a triple threat singer, songwriter, and guitarist. It was in 1962, while just turning 20, that she had the number one hit on the charts with her original penned “You’ll Lose A Good Thing.” Singing while playing an expressive left handed guitar on her records and live performances, Barbara Lynn weaved a masterful sound between blues and soul which went on to influence a horde of imitators.

Barbara Lynn Ozen was born on January 16, 1942 in Beaumont, TX. Though she started out playing piano as a child, she quickly switched to guitar after falling under the influence of the Elvis and growing rock and roll craze. Inspired by electric bluesmen like Guitar Slim and Jimmy Reed, by her teen years Lynn was winning talent shows leading her all-female band, Bobbie Lynn and the Idols. Lynn soon graduated to the local clubs, where one night she so impressed swamp pop singer Joe Berry that he introduced the young talent to famed producer Huey Meaux. He would go on to produce her biggest hits and the ones which established her enduring reputation, on the Jamie label.

Barbara Lynn was a national sensation in popular music, scoring a #1 R&B hit and Top 10 pop hit in 1962 with her first single, “You'll Lose A Good Thing.” More chart records and touring followed, having appeared twice on American Bandstand, and even had her song “Oh Baby (We've Got A Good Thing Goin')” recorded by The Rolling Stones.

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Album Barbara Lynn: The Jamie SIngles Collection 1962-1965 by Barbara Lynn

Barbara Lynn: The...

Jamie / Guyden
2008

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