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Clifton Chenier

In the history of popular and vernacular music it is usually hard to pinpoint the genesis of a new genre or style on one particular individual. Many musicologists acknowledge today that blacks in Louisiana adopted the accordion before their white Cajun counterparts. Modern zydeco music even includes Caribbean and Latin rhythms along with strains of modern rock and pop. Clifton Chenier did not create zydeco a credit generally given to Amédé Ardoin, a diatonic accordionist who in 1929 cut the first zydeco record though he certainly codified the way this Louisiana Creole music is still played in the bayous and beyond.

Bypassing the old fashioned diatonic button squeezebox and mastering the chromatic piano accordion, Clifton Chenier developed fresh approaches to traditional French folk songs and the blues. Starting out in the bayous of southern Louisiana, he became an international superstar with his Red Hot Louisiana Band.

Clifton Chenier was born June 25, 1925, in Opelousas, St. Landry Parish, Louisiana, his father, Joseph Chenier, was a local musician who played the accordion at home and at dances known as fais dodos. As a child, Clifton worked on a farm outside Opelousas and was interested in music. He learned the basics of accordion playing from his father, and by the time he was 16 years of age, he was playing the accordion, accompanied by his older brother Cleveland, who played the frottoir (washboard or rub-board) with a metal bottle opener. The frottoir was adapted by early African American Creoles as a rhythm instrument.

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Discography

Sings the Blues

Sings the Blues

Arhoolie Records
2004

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Live! At Grant Street

Arhoolie Records
2001

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Bogalusa Boogie

Bogalusa Boogie

Arhoolie Records
1976

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