All About Jazz

Home » Musicians » Connie Haines

Connie Haines

Born Yvonne Jasme, big band vocalist Connie Haines began singing and dancing at an early age. Her big break came in 1935, at age 13, when she won an amateur contest on Fred Allen's NBC radio program. During the late 1930s she worked for Howard Lally's orchestra.

In 1939 bandleader Harry James heard Haines rehearsing at a New York music publishing company and hired her for his band, changing her name. She left the following year and kept busy with solo engagements around the New York area before being hired by Tommy Dorsey, where she joined former James bandmate Frank Sinatra.

In 1941 Haines landed the spot as featured vocalist on Abbott and Costello's radio program. She spent four years with the show. Haines has continued performing up to this day.

Haines made 200 recordings, including 24 records that sold more than 50,000 copies; regularly filled up prestigious nightclubs like the Latin Quarter in New York; and performed five times at the White House. Polls in music magazines in the 1940s rated her as one of the top female band singers.

While Sinatra specialized at the time in ballads and slow foxtrots, Haines threw herself into rhythmic up-tempo tunes. “Where did you learn to swing like that?” Dorsey asked when he first heard her at a club in New Jersey. “And when can you join my band?”

Read more

Tags

Albums

Watch

Similar

Billie Holiday Billie Holiday
voice / vocals
June Christy June Christy
voice / vocals
Bing Crosby Bing Crosby
voice / vocals
Peggy Lee Peggy Lee
voice / vocals
Doris Day Doris Day
voice / vocals
Tommy Dorsey Tommy Dorsey
trombone
Helen Ward Helen Ward
voice / vocals
Mildred Bailey Mildred Bailey
voice / vocals
Helen Forrest Helen Forrest
voice / vocals
Connee Boswell Connee Boswell
voice / vocals

Shop Amazon

All About Jazz needs your support

Donate
All About Jazz & Jazz Near You were built to promote jazz music: both recorded and live events. We rely primarily on venues, festivals and musicians to promote their events through our platform. With club closures, shelter in place and an uncertain future, we've pivoted our platform to collect, promote and broadcast livestream concerts to support our jazz musician friends. This is a significant but neccesary effort that will help musicians now, and in the future. You can help offset the cost of this essential undertaking by making a donation today. In return, we'll deliver an ad-free experience (which includes hiding the bottom right video ad). Thank you.

Get more of a good thing

Our weekly newsletter highlights our top stories and includes your local jazz events calendar.