Mansur Scott

Vocalist/percussionist extraordinaire Mansur Scott, known all over New York City as a serious sage and “the jazz mayor of Harlem” is the epitome of a working jazz musician. He has been on the front lines, pushing the music forward, making it visible, boldly, and making it strongly heard throughout all of the boroughs of the city for decades. He is known in Harlem' s jazz community as a warm, peaceful, graceful, adventurous, humble performer, who has been on most of the stages in the jazz spots, especially uptown like St. Nick's Pub.

It was at an appearance at St. Nick's, years ago. when he collapsed on stage after a demanding schedule, one that included performing two or three events a day. He had a heart attack and later a stroke which he thought would end his career. He had just reached a point in show business where he thought things were finally on the up—with appearances off-Broadway and subbing for the late legendary vocalist Leon Thomas when Thomas became ill. Scott said that he was performing as a stand-in for Thomas, the night he died. After his stroke, Scott rehabilitated himself, resumed his career, tours extensively in Europe and has recorded his first recording called quite appropriately: Sometimes Forgotten, Sometimes Remembered.

This is a highly-personal and autobiographical CD that reaches out and grabs listeners and takes them on a journey that is so pleasurable and real that you never want to stop playing it. Scott's voice, which some describe as a mix of the great Joe Williams, of the fantastic Count Basie big bands of the 1940s and the 1950s; and the late Coltrane disciple, soulful singer, Leon Thomas; is powerful, raw, and spiritual. It has a sense of urgency with it that captures the essence of any moment. This is especially true with the very upbeat, sharp and swinging treatment he gives “Days Of Wine and Roses,” where his straight ahead vocals are quite acrobatic, daring, defying gravity. The “Days” is definitely one of the best tunes on the album, not only because it swings mightily, but because it is tenderly, touchingly, dedicated to his late beloved wife “Sabra.”

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