Marty Grosz

Martin O. Grosz was born February 28, 1930 in Berlin, Germany. He has been a resident of the USA since the age of three and he began playing banjo and guitar in and around New York while still attending college. His musical inclinations were towards Dixieland jazz

After military service he settled in Chicago and played there for several years in local clubs, making a few records but making little impression on the national jazz scene. In the mid-70s he moved back to New York and joined Soprano Summit, the excellent small band co-led by Bob Wilber and Kenny Davern.

According to the critics, Marty Grosz is today's foremost jazz rhythm guitarist and chord soloist. He is virtually the only major jazz guitarist who doesn't use an amplifier. This makes him either the last remaining proponent of the acoustic guitar tradition in jazz or the lone harbinger of a new non-electric movement.

Marty sings, too. His vocals have become as much in demand at record sessions and jazz concerts as his driving guitar rhythm. They are delivered in styles ranging from barrelhouse abandon to whispered restraint, and are sometimes raucous, often mischievous, but almost always informed with a wry sense of the absurd. Grosz was born in Berlin, Germany in 1930. By the time he reached his third birthday, his toes were tapping to radio songs in New York. His urge for musical expression manifested itself when he began strumming a ukelele at the age of eight. A few years later he heard a record that highlighted guitarist Bernard Addison's shuffle-beat behind Roy Eldridge's trumpet: Out went the uke and in came the guitar.

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Acoustic Heat

Enja Records
2006

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Marty Grosz and His...

Arbors Records
2006

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Hooray For Bix!

Fantasy Jazz
2000

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Unsaturated Fats

Enja Records
1991

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Sings Of Love And...

Enja Records
1987

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