The Meters

The Meters created a unique sound that lasted through the sixties and seventies and was reborn in the late eighties. Their trademark sound blends funk, blues, and dance grooves with a New Orleans vibe, where they have become an institution.

The history of this native New Orleans band dates back to 1967, when keyboardist Art Neville recruited George Porter Jr., Joseph (Zigaboo) Modeliste and Leo Nocentelli to form The Meters. When Neville formed the band, he had already been a prominent member of the New Orleans music community for 15 years. He was still in high school when, leading The Hawkettes, he cut the 1954 hit single “Mardi Gras Mambo”, which is still pressed every year at Carnival time.

After working with Allen Toussaint on some Lee Dorsey tracks, The Meters were told to lay down some tracks of their own. Between 1967 and 1969, they recorded four consecutive hit singles: “Sophisticated Cissy,” “Cissy Strut,” “Ease Back,” and “Look a Py Py,” which all reached the Top 10 on the R&B charts. Neville created a band that would rule the New Orleans music community for decades to come.

From 1971 to 1978 The Meters recorded five albums on the Warner/Reprise label. Cyril Neville, Art Neville's brother, joined the band in 1975 as a percussionist and vocalist for three of those albums, also recording the critically acclaimed “The Wild Tchoupitoulas,” which was recorded with Neville's uncle, Big Chief Jolly, the most celebrated member of the Mardi Gras Indians. Simultaneously, the band was widely heard playing on albums by Dr. John, Robert Palmer, King Biscuit Boy,Lee Dorsey ,Allen Toussaint and a Mardi Gras single released by Paul McCartney and Wings.

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