Peter Hook

Peter Hook (born 13 February 1956) is an English bass player, musician, singer, DJ, nightclub owner, record company boss and author. He is currently lead vocalist and bassist for Peter Hook and The Light. Hook was a co-founder of the post-punk band Joy Division along with Bernard Sumner in the mid-1970s. Following the death of lead singer Ian Curtis, the band reformed as New Order, and Hook played bass with them until his departure in 2007. The band have since reformed without Hook. He has also recorded an album with Revenge (One True Passion), two albums with Monaco (Music for Pleasure and Monaco) and one album with Freebass (It's A Beautiful Life) as bassist, keyboardist and lead vocalist. Early life

Born in Salford, Lancashire, to Irene Acton (1928–2000; since 1962 Irene Hook), and John Woodhead.[1] When he was the age of 3, in 1959, his parents divorced and he and his brothers were brought up by his maternal grandmother Alicia Acton (born Chapman; 1896–1968) until 1962, when his mother re-married Ernest W. Hook.[citation needed]. Like his band-mate Bernard Sumner, he took his stepfather's surname, although in contrast to his friend he kept it, even creating his nickname, “Hooky,” from it. Because of his stepfather's work, he spent part of his childhood in Jamaica before returning to Salford.[2] [edit]Playing style

Hook has said that he developed his high bass lines when he started playing with Joy Division because the speaker that he used initially (bought from his former art teacher for £10) was so poor he had to play that high to be able to hear what he was doing, as Bernard Sumner's guitar was so loud.[3] With New Order's ever increasing use of sequenced synthesised bass, especially throughout most of 1989's Technique and 1993's Republic, Hook's bass playing became ever more melodic and rhythmic, often exploiting the higher notes on his basses. Hook also contributed backing vocals on numerous Joy Division songs in concert and sang co-lead with Ian Curtis on live versions of Joy Division's “Interzone.” He sings lead on two New Order songs (”Dreams Never End” and “Doubts Even Here” from the 1981 debut album Movement). Other work

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