All About Jazz

Home » Musicians » Smiley Lewis

Smiley Lewis Smiley Lewis

Smiley Lewis was one of the big R&B stars to come out New Orleans in the 1950’s. Born in DeQuincey, Louisiana, with the given name of Overton Lemons, he moved to New Orleans in his mid-teens, equipped with a big, booming voice and some guitar skills. he played clubs in the French Quarter, often with pianist Tuts Washington (and sometimes billed as “Smiling” Lewis). By 1947, his following was strong enough to merit a session for DeLuxe Records, which issued his debut 78, “Here Comes Smiley.” Then Lewis signed with Imperial in 1950, debuting with Tee-Nah-Nah and things began to move.

As the New Orleans R&B sound developed rapidly during the early 1950s, so did Lewis, as he rocked ever harder on “Lillie Mae,” “Ain't Gonna Do It,” and “Big Mamou.” He scored his first national hit in 1952 with “The Bells Are Ringing,” and enjoyed his biggest sales in 1955 with “I Hear You Knocking.” Other classic songs from Lewis were “Bumpity Bump,” “Down the Road,” “Lost Weekend,” “Real Gone Lover,” ”She's Got Me Hook, Line and Sinker,” and” Rootin' and Tootin'.” In front of the Crescent City's hottest players, Lewis roared like a lion. Strangely, Fats Domino fared better with some of Smiley Lewis' tunes than Lewis did (”Blue Monday,” and “I Hear You Knocking” in particular).

Similarly, Elvis Presley cleaned up the naughty “One Night” and hit big with it, but Lewis's original had already done well in 1956, as had “Please Listen to Me.” His blistering “Shame, Shame, Shame” found its way onto the soundtrack of the steamy Hollywood film “Baby Doll” in 1957

Read more

Tags

Photos

Albums

 

No No

Arhoolie Records
1986

buy

Watch

Similar

T-Bone Walker T-Bone Walker
guitar, electric
Big Joe Turner Big Joe Turner
voice / vocals
Percy Mayfield Percy Mayfield
voice / vocals
Earl King Earl King
guitar, electric
Pee Wee Crayton Pee Wee Crayton
guitar, electric
Lee Dorsey Lee Dorsey
voice / vocals

Shop Amazon

All About Jazz needs your support

Donate
All About Jazz & Jazz Near You were built to promote jazz music: both recorded and live events. We rely primarily on venues, festivals and musicians to promote their events through our platform. With club closures, shelter in place and an uncertain future, we've pivoted our platform to collect, promote and broadcast livestream concerts to support our jazz musician friends. This is a significant but neccesary effort that will help musicians now, and in the future. You can help offset the cost of this essential undertaking by making a donation today. In return, we'll deliver an ad-free experience (which includes hiding the bottom right video ad). Thank you.

Get more of a good thing

Our weekly newsletter highlights our top stories and includes your local jazz events calendar.