All About Jazz

Home » Musicians » Stan Kenton

Stan Kenton

Stanley Newcomb Kenton (December 15, 1911 - August 25, 1979) led a highly innovative, influential, and often controversial American jazz orchestra. In later years he was widely active as an educator.

Stan Kenton was born in Wichita, Kansas, and raised first in Colorado and then in California. He learned piano as a child, and while still a teenager toured with various bands. In June 1941 he formed his own band, which developed into one of the best-known West Coast ensembles of the Forties.

Kenton's musical aggregations were decidedly “orchestras.” Sometimes consisting of two dozen or more musicians at once, they produced an unmistakable Kenton sound--as recognizable as that of the bands of Glenn Miller, Duke Ellington, or Count Basie. So large an orchestra was able to produce a tremendous, at times overpowering, volume in the dance and concert halls of the land; among musical conservatives it developed a reputation for playing strange-sounding pieces much too loudly, and indeed one comical MC introduced Stan Kenton as “Cant Standit.”

Read more

5 Photos View in Slideshow

Discography

Mellophonium Memoirs

Mellophonium Memoirs

Tantara Productions
2017

buy
 

Cuban Episodes

Point Entertainment
2005

buy
 

Viva Kenton!

Point Entertainment
2005

buy

Similar

Glenn Miller Glenn Miller
trombone
Artie Shaw Artie Shaw
clarinet
Woody Herman Woody Herman
band/orchestra
Harry James Harry James
trumpet
Gordon Goodwin Gordon Goodwin
composer/conductor
Charlie Barnet Charlie Barnet
composer/conductor
Jimmie Lunceford Jimmie Lunceford
composer/conductor